[Writer’s Thing] Building a Powerful Vocabulary


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Building vocabulary is very important for a budding writer, and only a writer can feel the feelings when he couldn’t express his emotions due to lack of words. Thanks to internet,though we can find the words we want, but for a fiction writer , not only the musical aptness of the word is important, but also the context is important too.As I am also a budding author, I am following the following way to build my vocab

Step 1: Read a lot. Yes, as you are going to be writer, obviously you will be spending more time sticking to your book or kindle.

Step 2: Mark and note all the unknown words you are facing while reading. In this computer age, you can easily go online, or use an e-dictionary and copy-paste all the words in your word doc file.

Step 3: Start reading and using them.

Like as shown below I found the following words while I was reading a book (can’t remember the name of the book).

1)odious

adjective extremely unpleasant; repulsive.

DERIVATIVES

odiously adverb

odiousness noun

ORIGIN

Middle English: from Old French odieus, from Latin odiosus, from odium ‘hatred’.

2)Excrescence  

n noun

1 an abnormal outgrowth on a body or plant.

2 an unattractive or superfluous addition or feature.

DERIVATIVES

excrescent adjective

3)conciliate  

n verb placate (someone); pacify. Øact as a mediator. Øformal reconcile.

DERIVATIVES

conciliation noun ;conciliative adjective

conciliator noun

conciliatory adjective

4)sedition

n noun conduct or speech inciting rebellion against the authority of a state or monarch.

DERIVATIVES

seditious adjective

seditiously adverb

5)perfunctory  

n adjective carried out with a minimum of effort or reflection.

DERIVATIVES

perfunctorily adverb

perfunctoriness noun

6)ignominious  

n adjective deserving or causing public disgrace or shame.

DERIVATIVES

ignominiously adverb

ignominiousness noun

ignominy noun

7)emancipate  

n verb set free, especially from legal, social, or political restrictions. >free from slavery. >Law set (a child) free from the authority of its parents.

DERIVATIVES

emancipation noun

emancipator noun

emancipatory adjective

8)onus

n noun a burden, duty, or responsibility.

9)crux  

n noun (plural cruxes or cruces ) (the crux) the decisive or most important point at issue. Øa particular point of difficulty.

10)propound  

n verb put forward (an idea, theory, etc.) for consideration.

DERIVATIVES

propounder noun

11)bludgeon  

n noun a thick stick with a heavy end, used as a weapon.

n verb 

1 beat with a bludgeon.

2 bully into doing something.

vocabulary_building (1)

Now, I shall use these words in the order given above to write a paragraph. I let the words lead me to write the next lines. See below (the above words used here are in italic ):

As he came up from the gutter he smiled, flashing his odious body with joy. He found the ring. The small dome shaped excrescence on his cheek supported a chunk of filth from the high drain.  His joy flushing out of his mouth in form of spittle. A joy that could not be conciliated by even winning a lottery. That silver ring is for his wife. No matter how much sedition is done on behalf of rude behaviour to drain-cleaners or filth-bearers, their plight couldn’t be touched by common people. Like their plight, their joy is theirs only, none can take part in that. The way we perfunctorily carry our daily chores, we could never even think of living one day of their life. But ironically, they can clean shit of others by hand with perfect perfunctoriness.  If, we, the ‘mango people’ choose a life like them then that will be the most ignominious profession for a person to have in our society. Even prostitution are held higher that this job. We dream of a country where all of the bondage will emancipate and a new world will emerge. But if we can’t respect people like them, that will always remain a far-fetched future. The crux of this whole matter is not any racial discrimination, but our overall misconception about profession. We just can’t accept that filth-cleaning can also be a job; a respectable job too. While we consider them as onus to our society, actually they are carrying all the weight of shit we are spreading. A clean India doesn’t look good from a person who always is shitting on roads and public places, without caring how bad impression it will have on a foreign tourists. Every year, every political party propounds a new scheme to serve the lower strata of our country, but in the end, those words end up forming garbage in streets. This kind of thinking must be bludgeoned brutally, for the betterment of whole.

Got it? Try it yourself and I am sure it will be of lot help. Of course, you can devise your own way of vocabulary building.

Thank you for reading. 🙂 ❤

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